Citations:

Text #8836

Editorial comment by Laura Knight-Jadczyk

Earthquake in Palestine derived from Dead Sea lake-bed cores.

See: Migowski & Agnon & Bookman & Negendank & Stein. "Recurrence Pattern of Holocene Earthquakes along the Dead Sea Transform Revealed by Varve-Counting and Radiocarbon Dating of Lacustrine Sediments". Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Vol. 222

Text #8929

Migowski & Agnon & Bookman & Negendank & Stein. "Recurrence Pattern of Holocene Earthquakes along the Dead Sea Transform Revealed by Varve-Counting and Radiocarbon Dating of Lacustrine Sediments". Earth and Planetary Science Letters. Vol. 222

HTML URL: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/2...

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Abstract: A high-resolution Holocene seismic history of the Dead Sea Transform (DST) is established from laminated sedimentary cores recovered at the shores of the Dead Sea. Radiocarbon dating and annual laminae counting yield excellent agreement between disturbed sedimentary structures (identified as seismites) and the historical earthquake record: All recent and historical strong events of the area were identified, including the major earthquakes of A.D. 1927, 1837, 1212, 1033, 749, and 31 B.C. The total of 53 seismites recognized along the entire Holocene profile indicate varying recurrence intervals of seismic activity between a few and 1000 years, with a conspicuous minimum rate at 2100–31 B.C. and a noticeable maximum during the past six to eight centuries. Most of the epicenters of the correlated earthquakes are situated very close to the Dead Sea (within 150 km) or up to 400 km north of it along the DST. Between 1000 B.C. and A.D. 1063, and from A.D. 1600 to recent time the epicenters are all located on the northern segment of the DST, whereas prior to 1000 B.C. and between A.D. 1000 and 1600 they appear to scatter along several segments of the DST. We establish how the local intensity exerts a control on the formation of seismites. At historically estimated intensities greater than VII, all well documented earthquakes are correlated, whereas at intensities smaller than VI none are matching. The periods with enhanced earthquake rate along the DST correlate with those along the North Anatolian Fault as opposed to the intervening East Anatolian Fault.

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