Geographical sites:

  • Aegean Sea (click here to focus in map) (see also Pleiades #560221)
    Pleiades_icon Aegaeum Mare water-open Geocontext: Aegean Sea/Aigaio Pelagos
    Description: The Aegean Sea is the largest body of water between Greece and Asia Minor and an embayment of the Mediterranean Sea.
  • Thera (click here to focus in map) (see also Pleiades #599973)
    Pleiades_icon Thera (island) island Geocontext: Santorini GRE
    Description: An island of the southern Aegean Sea, Thera is the southernmost of the Cyclades. The island's present form is the result of a Middle Bronze Age volcanic eruption that destroyed a Minoan settlement on the island.
  • Crete (click here to focus in map) (see also Pleiades #589748)
    Pleiades_icon Creta Ins. island Geocontext: island
    Description: The island of Crete is the largest of the Greek islands and the fifth-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea.
  • Cyclades (click here to focus in map) (see also Pleiades #560353)
    Pleiades_icon Cyclades Inss. archipelago, island Geocontext: island-group
    Description: An island group in the Aegean Sea composed of over 200 islands.
  • Tel Aviv (click here to focus in map) (see also GeoNames #293397)
    Geonames_icon Tel Aviv seat of a first-order administrative division Geocontext: Asia/Jerusalem
  • Cyprus (click here to focus in map) (see also Pleiades #707498)
    Pleiades_icon Cyprus (island) island Geocontext: island
    Description: Third largest island in the Mediterranean Sea.
  • Sicily (click here to focus in map) (see also Pleiades #462492)
    Pleiades_icon Sicilia (island) island Description: Sicily is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea and has been the site of human habitation since ca. 8,000 BC. In historical terms Sicily has seen important settlement activity connected to numerous culture groups - Punic, Carthaginian, Greek, Roman, Vandalic, Ostrogothic, Byzantine, Arabic, and Norman.

Citations:

Text #8947

McCoy & Heiken. "Tsunami Generated by the Late Bronze Age Eruption of Thera (Santorini) Greece". Pure and Applied Geophysics. Vol. 157
[pp. 1227--1256]

PDF URL: https://windward.hawaii.edu/facstaff/mcco...

Tsunami were generated by the Late Bronze Age (LBA) eruption of the island of Thera, in the southern Aegean Sea, by both caldera collapse, and by the entrance of pyroclastic surges/flows and lahars/debris flows into the sea. Tsunami generated by caldera collapse propagated to the west producing deep sea sedimentary deposits in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea known as homogenites; open ocean wave heights of about 1.9 - 17 m are estimated. Tsunami generated by the entry of pyroclastic flows/surges and lahars/debris flows into the sea propagated in all directions around the island; wave heights along the coastal areas were about 7- 12 m as estimated by newly identified tsunami deposits on eastern Thera as well as from pumice deposits found at archaeological sites on northern and eastern Crete.

Text #8948

Freewalt. "The Theran Disruption"

PDF URL: https://www.academia.edu/6400428/The_Mino...

The collapse of the caldera is believed to have created pyroclastic flows up to 55 meters thick, which entered the Aegean Sea off Thera’s coast and created powerful tsunamis that flooded coastal areas around the region. Evidence of tsunami inundation from the Minoan eruption has been found on the other Cyclades Islands, northern Crete, southwestern Asia Minor, Israel near Tel Aviv, Cyprus, and as far away as Sicily.

Text #8959

Editorial comment by Laura Knight-Jadczyk

The dating of the Theran eruption has been corrected to 1650 BC by Manning et al. See E#5160

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